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in high threat environment. how to get out beyond the walls of our facilities. how do we remain successful in the private sector while still securing our embassies and protecting our people in these environments? the review board correctly points out the department has been resource-challenge for many years. this has constrained our mission, and restricting the use of resources even for security has become a conditioned response. decisions about the security resources being made more on costs than value. the approach fails to recognize the diplomacy and foreign aid put down payments in terms of good will, open borders for the export of american products, protection of intellectual property, and cooperation on security and counterterrorism. there is a lot to discuss. welcome again. we appreciate your time. on a personal note, since this is likely to be your last hearing before this committee and your leadership will be missed, i speak for many when i say you have been an outstanding secretary of state, you have changed the face of america abroad, and extended the house killed the bill -- ho
of this. and economy, like china, you do have real domestic -- you have a very adverse environment and you still can maintain some growth. >> is very different. the issues that are applicable, there's a lot of room in focusing on this becomes fundamentally important now. in ordered see that it is a commodity market. it would be to use the proceeds for decoupling. i think we tend to be a dedicated militia. we have new words and we repeat them. and then we realize that what we need to understand right now is wider than africa's interest that we are well organized and we are not decoupled in the short-term. >> okay, moving on to be other issues, the question is that essentially the eurozone has no growth policy and relevant time horizons. the question is how to get through the next few years. it was talked about, and if i understood it, she more or less said it does take years to get back to normal and that's just what you'll have to live with. and there isn't really much that one can do about it. what would your response be on this issue in the relatively near term? >> yes, he was quoting a
and regulations with very little impact on the global climate. in this tight budget environment with so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing. i don't know if you have specific thoughts. >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts on it more than we have time now. and i'm not going to abuse that privilege. but i will say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. you want to do business and do it well in america, we got to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you, massachusetts, fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they're growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. t
environment, with some any competing priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country, and not help a schoolboy -- not help us globally. >> i have a lot of specific thoughts on it. the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the down sides that you are expressing concern about. and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. if you want to do business and do it well in america, you have to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. in massachusetts, the fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they are growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. this is a job creator. i cannot emphasize that strongly enough. the market that made america rich -- richer -- we have always been reached -- but the market them it is richer in the 1990's was the technology market. it was a $1 trillion market with 1 billion us
environment in eastern libya and in benghazi and in a direct threat on our compound. we have work to do inside of the department and with our partners and of the dod and the intelligence community to constantly be taking that information and make sure it does get to the right people and it isn't somehow stovepipe or stalled but that it does rise to decision makers and i am committed to improving every way that i can with the arb told us to do on assessing our intelligence and i think it's fair to say, congressman, that we have to do this now because i predict that we are going to be as we saw in algeria seeing all kinds of asymmetric threats not just to the government is devotees that private sector facilities in to nisha although we protected our embassy and our school was badly damaged so we have to take a broad view and i think it is a start but it's not the whole story. >> mr. grayson from florida. 63 mr. chairman and secretary clinton for your contributions to securing america's place in the world for the past four years and for your contributions towards world peace. the first question i
who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice question for you. is he a fool, or a villain? [laughter] >> i think he learned a lesson or two with
certainly aware of the increasing threat environment. i not only was briefed on that, i testified to that effect. and there were constant evaluations going on. but no one, not the ambassador, security professionals, the intelligence community ever recommended closing that mission. and the reason they didn't was because the ongoing threat environment had up until the spring before our terrible attack in benghazi been a result of post-conflict conditions. that is something that we're familiar with all over the world. yes, there were some attacks, as you have said, but our evaluation of them and the recommendation by the security professionals was that those were all manageable because we had a lot of that around the world. i mean, there is a long list of attacks that have been foiled, assassination plots that have been prevented. so this is not some -- you know, one off event. this is considered in an atmosphere of a lot of threats and dangers. and at the end of the day, you know, there was a decision made that this would be evaluated but it would not be closed and, unfortunately, w
the right environment is the most important. how we can create this environment today with this kind of unstability, we need political stability. we need peace. we have struggle between the palestinians and israelis and egypt. we have to talk about it and be very frank to see how we can get to the end of this. for this reason, yes, frankly speaking i'm not very optimistic about all today. if i ask anyone what you want me to talk to about, talk about democracy, freedom, transparency, governments, rulers. let us work for this and this is very important. >> let me ask --, let me ask someone who has worked with some of these institutions under the most ex-rd nary conditions. you have helped functioning institution in the west bank. you created an economy that created extraordinary growth over the last three years and you've done it under very adverse circumstances. so what would be your advice to people trying to build these institutions? >> thank you. honestly i continue to the effort help the institutions not just myself and to get ready for the emergence of fully independent and state
on the threat environment that the united states is in. for most of history we don't talk about this very much. we have maintained a strong military, not so that we can buy, so that we can not fight. it is a point i think that tom made which is important, it is i want to segue to fred, is to understand what it is that is involved in a military operation. fred has just finished a very important piece of work, i should a shorter longer, an interactive piece on the web that i know we be happy to share with folks that explains just what it is that we can do with particular numbers of troops we have as the president makes critical decisions about afghanistan but it's not just about warfighters and bureaucrats in d.c. fighting a war is a big logistical exercise. fred, do want to talk about that and some of those ceramic decisions? >> sure. if we become very accustomed to throwing numbers of troops around and people of gotten way too comfortable with pulling numbers out of the air and discussing them as though they were serious, and the effect of that is that very few americans i think actually under
with little impact on the global climate. in the tight budget environment with the so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought in to limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy or country, and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing there. i dmont if you have specific thoughts? >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts. more than we have time for now. i'm not going abuse the privilege. ly say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy, and the opportunity of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you're expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues in this. you want to do business and do it well in america? we've got get to the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you massachusetts that the fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy e fresh sei in -- efficiency in companies. they are growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. this is a job creator. i can'
of the political parties. i worry about the environment and all kinds of things, but the reality -- reliability of the u.s. debt, not at all. i am worried about the social and political stability of the world. a large part of europe that is depressioneriencing great levels of unemployment. and how long can we sustain u stable democratic system when 60 percent of the young people are out of work? that is the concern in europe right now. host: the twitter question touches on this. also, are there any models in europe that are succeeding? guest: if you look at sweden has handled this very well. the excess of welfare state is the problem. the biggest welfare state in the world and has driven through the crisis beautifully. my favorite, the little economy that could, iceland. they were supposed to turn into a smoking whole, but they broke their rules. they did not bail out the bankers. they were willing to let the currency to value. they were willing to let there be controls. it has a lower and a plumber rate than we do right now. -- unemployment rate than we do right now. britain is interesting. wh
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)